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Pectins and Pectinases

  • Pectins and Pectinases

Pectins and Pectinases

H.A. Schols, R.G.F. Visser and A.G.J. Voragen

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Author(s): H.A. Schols, R.G.F. Visser and A.G.J. Voragen

About The Book

Pectin extracted from suitable plant sources is used as food ingredient for its gelling, stabilizing and thickening functionalities. Pectic substances also have a great impact on the quality of fresh and processed foods particularly fruits and vegetables. Plant products, fresh, extracted or processed, constitute a large part of the human diet. As a fibre, naturally present in these food products, pectic substances fulfil a nutritional function and are increasingly of interest as a health promoting polysaccharide. Pectin is one of the major components of the cell wall of dicotyledonous plants and probably one of the most complex macromolecules in nature.

This book provides an update account of the most significant state of the art research on pectin and demonstrates that significant progress has been made in recent years. The book addresses progress made in the fields of biosynthesis and health modulating activities of pectin fractions, among other things. Research reported uses the most advanced current spectroscopic techniques and immunodetection methods combined with microscopy and chromatography, genomics of pectic enzymes of Aspergillus niger, and interaction of pectins with proteins.Pectin extracted from suitable plant sources is used as food ingredient for its gelling, stabilizing and thickening functionalities. Pectic substances also have a great impact on the quality of fresh and processed foods particularly fruits and vegetables. Plant products, fresh, extracted or processed, constitute a large part of the human diet. As a fibre, naturally present in these food products, pectic substances fulfil a nutritional function and are increasingly of interest as a health promoting polysaccharide. Pectin is one of the major components of the cell wall of dicotyledonous plants and probably one of the most complex macromolecules in nature.

The progress documented in this book allows us to increasingly identify and influence the functionality of pectins and pectic enzymes both in vitro after isolation, as well as in the plants themselves. This knowledge is also reflected in new applications of pectin and pectin degrading enzymes. 'Pectins and Pectinases' is of interest to beginning and advanced researchers and food specialists in academic and commercial food industry settings globally.

Additional Information

Author H.A. Schols, R.G.F. Visser and A.G.J. Voragen
Availability In Print
Dimensions Unknown
Extent 331 pp
ISBN 9789086861088
Publication date 2009
Book Type Hardcover

Contents

Preface

Part 1 ? Structure of pectins

Revealing pectin?s structure

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Research strategy
  • 3. Elucidation of the chemical structure of pectin
  • 4. Ongoing search for new analytical methods for use in pectin research
  • 5. Future perspectives
  • References

Hydrodynamic properties of isolated pectin domains: a way to figure out pectin macromolecular structure?

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Pectins with varying GalA/Rha ratios can be isolated from cell wall materials of different plant sources
  • 3. Isolated pectins from different plant sources encompass various amounts of HG domains of very similar degrees of polymerisation
  • 4. Isolated RGI backbone domains exhibit variable degrees of polymerisation depending on the plant source
  • 5. The Arabidopsis quasimodo2 mutant is HG-deficient but the remaining HG have maintained the same size as those in the wild type
  • 6. Conclusions
  • References

Structural elucidation of cell wall polysaccharides from okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench)

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Material and methods
  • 3. Results and discussions
  • 4. Conclusions
  • References

Molecular shape and functionality of HM pectin

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and methods
  • 3. Results
  • 4. Discussion
  • 5. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References

Characterization of sugar beet pectin in relation to emulsion functionality

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and methods
  • 3. Results
  • 4. Discussion
  • 5. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References

Influence of pectin structure on the mechanical properties of flax fibres: a comparison between linseed-winter variety (Oliver) and a fibre-spring variety of flax (Hermes)

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Mechanical properties
  • 3. Morphology, anatomy and microstructure analyses
  • 4. Chemical composition of fibres
  • 5. Conclusion
  • References

Part 2 ? Pectinases

Advances in pectinolytic enzymes, genes and regulation in Aspergillus

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Pectinolytic enzymes from Aspergillus
  • 3. Pectinolytic genes and genomics
  • 4. Regulation of pectinolytic gene expression in Aspergillus
  • 5. Concluding remarks
  • References

Purification and cloning of a rhamnogalacturonase tolerant to an acetylated rhamnogalacturonan

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Material and methods
  • 3. Results and discussion
  • 4. Conclusion
  • References

Behavior of pectin methylesterases in pectic gels

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and methods
  • 3. Results and discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • References

Part 3 ? Pectins in plant cell walls

Pectins, cell wall biology and the elucidation of functions

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Results and discussion
  • References

Pectins in secondary cell walls: modifications during cell wall assembly and maturation

  • Abstract
  • 1. Pectins can be the major non-cellulosic polysaccharides in secondary cell walls
  • 2. Pectins can be tightly bound to cellulose
  • 3. Nascent pectic galactan from flax phloem fibers
  • 4. Variability of the galactan structure. Blockwise arrangement?
  • 5. Why the galactan?
  • 6. Modifications of pectic galactan during cell wall assembly and maturation
  • 7. Flax fibers contain a lot of free galactose at the stage of secondary cell wall formation
  • 8. Concluding remarks
  • Acknowledgements
  • References

In vitro synthesis of polygalacturonic acid

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Results and discussion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References

Which mango processing residues are suitable for pectin recovery in terms of yield, molecular and techno-functional properties of extractable pectins?

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Material and methods
  • 3. Results and discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References

Extraction and functional properties of ?green labelled? pectin from plant by-products

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Material and methods
  • 3. Results and discussion
  • 4. Conclusion
  • References

Part 4 ? Functionality and applications of pectins

Pectin ? β-lactoglobulin complex formation: influence of pectin overall charge and local charge density

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and methods
  • 3. Results
  • 4. Conclusions
  • References

Valencia orange pectinmethylesterases, charge modification of pectins, and applications to food technology and drug delivery

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and methods
  • 3. Results and discussion
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgement
  • Reference

The use of pectin modifying treatments to minimize texture and structure degradation of frozen fruits and vegetables

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Material and methods
  • 3. Results and discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References

Texture improvement of processed carrots by modifying pectin

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and methods
  • 3. Results and discussion
  • 4. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References

Floatation: scourge of fruit processors?

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Physics of floatation
  • 3. Materials and methods
  • 4. Results
  • 5. Conclusions
  • References

Part 5 ? Health aspects of pectins

Recent studies on structures and intestinal immunity modulating activities of pectins and pectic polysaccharides from medicinal herbs

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Intestinal immune system and its modulating polysaccharides in medicinal herbs
  • 3. Structural requirements for intestinal immune system modulating activity
  • 4. Stimulatory effect of medicinal herb and its polysaccharide fraction on G-CSF secretion from intestinal epithelial cells
  • 5. Stimulatory effect of a pectic polysaccharide, bupleuran 2IIc on G-CSF secretion from intestinal epithelial cells.
  • 6. Conclusion
  • References

New bioactive and biobased product applications of pectin

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Prebiotics
  • 3. Bacterial adhesion
  • 4. Cancer
  • 5. Heavy metal chelation and detoxification
  • 6. Biobased products
  • 7. Conclusions
  • References

PectiCoat: immobilized enzymatically-tailored pectins to improve the biocompatibility of medical devices

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Materials and methods
  • 3. Results and discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References

Index

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